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What does it mean Quick Find Pattern in v1.0.0.0?

How does it work?

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Pattern Options

Built-in pattern matching provides a versatile tool for string comparisons. The pattern-matching features allow you to match each character in string against a specific character, a wildcard character, a character list, or a character range. The following table shows the characters allowed in pattern and what they match.

Characters in pattern Matches in string
? Any single character
* Zero or more characters
# Any single digit (0–9)
[ charlist ] Any single character in charlist
[! charlist ] Any single character not in charlist

 

Character Lists

A group of one or more characters (charlist) enclosed in brackets ([ ]) can be used to match any single character in string and can include almost any character code, including digits.

An exclamation point (!) at the beginning of charlist means that a match is made if any character except the characters in charlist is found in string. When used outside brackets, the exclamation point matches itself.

 

Special Characters

To match the special characters left bracket ([), question mark (?), number sign (#), and asterisk (*), enclose them in brackets. The right bracket (]) cannot be used within a group to match itself, but it can be used outside a group as an individual character.

The character sequence [] is considered a zero-length string (""). However, it cannot be part of a character list enclosed in brackets.

 

Character Ranges

By using a hyphen () to separate the lower and upper bounds of the range, charlist can specify a range of characters. For example, [A–Z] results in a match if the corresponding character position in string contains any character within the range AZ, and [!H–L] results in a match if the corresponding character position contains any character outside the range HL.

When you specify a range of characters, they must appear in ascending sort order, that is, from lowest to highest. Thus, [A–Z] is a valid pattern, but [Z–A] is not.

 

Multiple Character Ranges

To specify multiple ranges for the same character position, put them within the same brackets without delimiters. For example, [A–CX–Z] results in a match if the corresponding character position in string contains any character within either the range AC or the range XZ.

 

Usage of the Hyphen

A hyphen () can appear either at the beginning (after an exclamation point, if any) or at the end of charlist to match itself. In any other location, the hyphen identifies a range of characters delimited by the characters on either side of the hyphen.

 

NOTE: Quick Find in PassNGuard v1.0.0.0 is NOT case-sensitive.

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